Thursday, January 21, 2010

razor blades


could someone please explain to me why I have to replace my razor blade after 4-5 uses? it's made of metal-- why should cutting hair be such a depleting task? can't they just make razor blades out of stronger metal?

12 comments:

Polly said...

Slow news day? LOL

It's a vast conspiracy by the razor companies to make us buy more blades. You ever notice how many times they give you a razor for free, but then charge you $10 for a package of 4 blades?

It could be worse. We could men who can't get away with skipping a few days of shaving unless they want to pretend they're growing a beard.

Greg Shahade said...

I don't have to change anywhere near that often.

Eric said...

I think I've been using the same blades for a good 6 months now...

Anonymous said...

the edges dull. You also don't need the 8 bladed crap gillette is pushing. Just use an old-doubled sided razor (I use a Merkur HD that is probably at least 20 years old) The blades do the same thing and are cheaper than multiblade cartridges

Mark Howitt said...

I don't have to change that often either- are u v hairy?

Anonymous said...

This was actually covered on the Discovery Channel in one of their many science exposition shows: razor blades cut better if they are very sharp. To be economic, the metal is very thin and not the most expensive alloy - better cutting blades combine a softer more pliant base with a harder but more brittle edge - but that would be really expensive. So they line up a series of cheaper to manufacture blades instead. In a way it reflects the economy and our societal approach. In a different culture, one would buy a really sharp blade and keep it sharp and use it for decades but that isn't our culture right now.

Anonymous said...

Also, it depends on what hair you are cutting. Arm pit and leg hair won't take down a razor as quickly as the hair around your lady parts will.

Mark Ginsburg said...

The question of how many blades should be in the razor is best is well covered in this theoretical treatise.

Additionally, I thought of an innovation. If the razor emitted a tiny laser, it could "see" upcoming obtacles and issue an audio warning such as "Warning! Mole coming up!" or "Warning! Unknown schmootz coming up, do not shave!" to guard against blade dullness.

Chuck said...

Perhaps you should consider obsidian. In archaeology school we learned that obsidian blades are much sharper (thinner) than the best ones we can currently make from metal or anything else. Obsidian is the best we have for high-precision tasks, such as surgery.

Gurdonark said...

A thin, sharp blade is a more comfortable and effective thing than a thick, dull blade. Thin mans less durability while sharp means a tendency to dull over time.

I'm still puzzling out why shampoo bottles are so user-unfriendly about extracting the last 1/3 of the shampoo. Surely some shape or other must be more effective than the current configurations.

Anonymous said...

Breaking news from the Jan. 23 press release in the press area of the USCF website. The USCF has settled its lawsuits with Polgar and Truong, including a $39,000 payment to Polgar's attorneys!

Anonymous said...

Actually, the best shave comes from the most durable razor. One straight razor (cut-throat for movie goers) either new or restored vintage will keep you and your son and probably his son after that stubble free and baby smooth. Of course having said that, I do own 5. Give it a try, you'll never look back. Aside from that, the second best and perhaps easier (with a straight there is a learning curve) is the double edge type, merkur and such.